A Space Discovery Milestone, as Kepler Confirms 1000th Exoplanet

Kepler Mission Logo

Kepler Mission logo

It was just a few years ago, and I was excitedly reporting to you the first few exoplanets that the NASA Kepler space instrument was detecting and verifying. In fact, it was almost exactly 4 years ago today that I was telling you about confirmed exoplanet find number 9. That exoplanet, Kepler-10b, was the first confirmed find of a rocky world outside of our own solar system, and at the time was the smallest exoplanet ever discovered, at 1.4 times the diameter of Earth. Then, at the end of that year, I was telling you about the first exoplanet located by Kepler in the “habitable zone”. And in a short period of time, I was telling you about dozens of more exoplanets being confirmed, and mini-planetary systems, and exoplanets that orbit two different stars.

Well since then, Kepler’s been hard at work confirming exoplanet after exoplanet. Today, that count has reached a milestone:

NASA’s Kepler Marks 1,000th Exoplanet Discovery, Uncovers More Small Worlds in Habitable Zones

1,000 confirmed other worlds, orbiting other stars. Let me put that significance into perspective: if you were born in 1988 or earlier, you are the exoplanet generation, for 1988 was the year the first exoplanet was confirmed. I don’t know about you, but that fact really resonates with me. It proclaims to me that I live in a fantastic moment of human history. I was alive when Earthlings first knew for certain that there were planets outside of our own Solar system. And in less than three decades, we’ve found over 1,000 more. There are worlds out there, and we’re alive precisely at the time to first know it. And what’s even cooler, at least eight of those are roughly the same size as our own world and orbit their host star in what’s referred to as the habitable zone.

Artist's depiction of the 8 Earthlike planets confirmed by Kepler.


The Kepler mission will always be one of the most exciting for me personally, and is expected to confirm thousands more exoplanets over the coming years. What a time to be alive!

If this is as interesting to you as it is to me, here are a couple of other articles posted about Kepler discoveries that I think you’ll particularly appreciate:

Exciting Kepler News – Part 1: Mini-Planetary System

Exciting Kepler News – Part 2: New Circumbinary Planets

Kepler Finds First Earth-Sized Planets

Exciting Kepler News – Part 2: New Circumbinary Planets

 There were two exciting Kepler (the NASA mission tasked with discovering planets outside of our solar system) news released yesterday. I’m covering them in two separate posts. This is Part 2; read Part 1.

The second exciting Kepler news release is one of the most interesting yet; in fact, this discovery confirmed the existence of an entirely new class of planetary system! Today, astronomers announced the discovery of two new “circumbinary” planet systems; these follow the first circumbinary planet system announced in September of last year, the planet Kepler-16b.

So what does circumbinary mean anyway, and why is it so interesting? Let me answer the first question, which should preclude the need to answer the second.

Scene from Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope, showing binary stars from Tatooine.
Classic scene from Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope, showing a dual sunset from the circumbinary planet, Tatooine.

A circumbinary planet is one that orbits not one, but two stars. When Kepler-16b was confirmed last Fall, it wasn’t clear whether we should expect many more circumbinary planets or if that system was just a fluke. With the discovery of these two new systems, it is becoming apparent that circumbinary planets are abundant.

What makes this interesting is that binary-star systems are abundant in our galaxy. From the report published in Nature:

The observed rate of circumbinary planets in our sample implies that more than ~1% of close binary stars have giant planets in nearly coplanar orbits, yielding a Galactic population of at least several million.

At least several million!

As for the planets themselves, they are both gas giants about the size of Saturn.  Kepler-34b orbits its binary-pair of Sun-like stars every 289 days, while the stars themselves orbit and eclipse each other every 28 days. Kepler-35b orbits its smaller pair of stars every 131 days, with the stars orbiting and eclipsing one another every 21 days.  The Kepler-34 and Kepler-35 systems lie in the constellation Cygnus, 4,900 and 5,400 light-years from Earth, respectively.

For more information, check out these links:

NASA Kepler News Release

The paper, published in Nature

The news release for Kepler-16b, the first circumbinary planet discovered

Exciting Kepler News – Part 1: Mini-Planetary System


There were two exciting Kepler (the NASA mission tasked with discovering planets outside of our solar system) news releases today. I’ll cover them in two separate posts. This is Part 1; stay tuned for Part 2.

KOI-961 Artist Concept

(Click to englarge / Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech)

Announced today was the discovery of the three smallest exoplanets (planets orbiting a star other than the Sun) ever discovered. These planets are orbiting a red dwarf star, currently1 named KOI-961 (KOI = Kepler Object of Interest). These planets are all smaller than our home planet, having a radius of .78, .73, and .57 that of Earth’s. (The smallest is about the size of Mars.) Though the planets are thought to be rocky, they orbit KOI-961 very closely, making them too hot to have any likelihood of being habitable.

The planets, currently 2 named KOI-961.01, KOI-961.02, and KOI-961.03, circle their host star at a fair clip, completing an orbit in less than two Earth-days. The star, KOI-961, has much less mass than our Sun. Its diameter is 1/6 the size of the Sun (which is only about 70% larger than Jupiter).

The discovery announced today came from a team of scientists, led by astronomers from the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). They made their discovery by analyzing publicly-released data from the Kepler mission. Studying KOI-961, they were able to greatly refine the preliminary estimated size of the red dwarf, and subsequently verify the presence of the three small exoplanets.

KOI-961 exoplanet comparisons

(Click to enlarge / Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech)

If you’re interested in further details about how Caltech made the discovery, I highly recommend you read their press release.

So let’s take a step back and ponder about what this latest discovery means. Coupled with the many frequent previous Kepler discoveries, we’re starting to create a big picture in which planets are ubiquitous throughout the Universe. Red dwarfs are the most common type of star in at least our own galaxy, and if one red dwarf has a planetary system, it’s likely more do… maybe even most do. We’re discovering planets around different types of stars; those similar to the Sun and those considerably different. Planets of different sizes and compositions as well. Not just large gas giants with little hope for containing life, but smaller, rocky worlds. Other Earth-sized worlds. Other Earth-like orbits. Other… Earths.

The speed at which we’re making these otherworldly discoveries is astounding and encouraging. It wasn’t long ago, I sat wondering if there were other planets out there, beyond our solar system, and if they might be discovered in my life. Today, I’m overwhelmed trying to keep up with all of the new exoplanet discoveries!

This is an exciting era to live in.

  1. I say currently, because once Kepler exoplanets are confirmed, the star generally gets the designation Kepler followed by a number, and the exoplanets are named after the star, followed by a letter designation. For example, Kepler-22b orbits the star Kepler-22. The designation “b” indicates it was the second expolanet discovered in that system.
  2. See the first footnote!

Kepler Finds First Earth-Sized Planets

NASA just announced that the Kepler mission has discovered the first Earth-sized planets outside of our solar system.

The planets, Kepler-20e and Kepler-20f,  while Earth-sized and thought to be rocky, are not believed to be habitable. They are much too close to their Type G star, Kepler-20, and too hot to retain liquid water.  Kepler-20e has a radius about 13% smaller than the Earth, making it just slightly smaller than Venus, and whips around Kepler-20 in a mere 6.1 days. Kepler-20f has a radius 3% larger than that of the Earth, with its year being a still fast 19.6 days.  The Kepler-20 system is approximately 1,000 light years from Earth.

Read the NASA release for even more details.

The Kepler mission is playing out like the fairy-tale, Goldilocks and the Three Bears. By that, I mean that we’re closing in on those planets that are “just right” for harboring life. We’ve discovered large planets inside the habitable zone that lacked a rocky surface (Kepler-22b) and gas giants not unlike Jupiter. Today, we’re finding Earth-sized planets with a rocky terrain. We’re getting ever so close to discovering those “Goldilocks” planets, with the size, composition, and being within the habitable zone, that allow them to be habitable.  And with more than 2300 candidates out there still waiting to be verified by Kepler, and Kepler’s current rate of discovery, I believe the announcement of a goldilocks planet is just around the corner.

Earth-class Planets Line Up

ANOTHER Kepler Announcement Tuesday

Kepler Mission Logo

Kepler Mission logo

Kepler keeps on Kepler-ing on.

Earlier this year, I mentioned that the Kepler mission team was about to make an announcement the following day about a new discovery. The following day, the Kepler team announced the confirmation of a 9th exoplanet. Then, just earlier this week, I posted about Kepler’s 28th confirmed discovery, Kepler-22b. Kepler-22b was exciting, as the data reveals that it exists within the habitable zone of its host star.

Well, Kepler is set to make another announcement tomorrow!:

NASA’s Kepler Announcing Newly Confirmed Planets

MOFFETT FIELD, Calif. — NASA will host a news teleconference at 1 p.m. EST, Tuesday, Dec. 20, announcing new discoveries by the Kepler mission.

Kepler is the first NASA mission capable of finding Earth-size planets in or near the “habitable zone,” the region in a planetary system where liquid water can exist on the surface of an orbiting planet. Although additional observations will be needed to reach that milestone, Kepler is detecting planets and possible candidates with a wide range of sizes and orbital distances to help scientists better understand our place in the galaxy.

We’ll check back in tomorrow to learn what new and exciting discovery Kepler has for us.

*UPDATE: The press conference starts in 1pm (EST); you can listen to it live at this link: http://www.nasa.gov/news/media/newsaudio/index.html

Kepler-22b: Things Are Beginning to Look Familiar

At the beginning of this year, we were excited to help break the news of the 9th planet confirmed by the Kepler spacecraft. Not even an entire year later, Kepler is up to 28 confirmed planets and more than 2000 more candidates waiting to be studied and potentially verified!

Last week, the Kepler mission had a very exciting announcement: Kepler-22b became the first exoplanet to be located within the habitable zone.

So let’s take a look at this exoplanet. Kepler-22b has a radius around 2.4 times that of the Earth. It is located 587 light-years from Earth, orbiting a star not so much different than our own. Though Kepler-22b’s host star — Kepler-22 — is slightly smaller and cooler than the Sun, Kepler-22b orbits closer than the Earth does to the Sun, compensating for the difference. Kepler-22b’s mass and surface composition is still unknown.
Kepler Diagram
(Diagram showing a comparison between our solar system’s habitable zone with Kepler-22’s. / Credit: NASA/Ames/JPL-Caltech)
So, we have a planet not too much larger than the Earth (though we don’t know its composition or mass), orbiting a star not too much smaller/cooler than our Sun, in the so-called habitable zone. What are the chances of life? First, we have to remember that while the Earth sits in our solar system’s habitable zone, so does Mars, Ceres, and sometimes Venus, and those are hardly bodies that appear to be very conducive for life (though, I think the book on Mars still has many pages to be read). But, then there’s the Earth, that Goldilocks planet within Sol’s habitable zone; life flourishing.

So. Not only is Kepler looking in the right places but it is finding what it is looking for, and proving quite able to find out just how rare planets like our own might be. At 587 light years from Earth we won’t be sending a probe to Kepler-22b to do reconnaissance anytime soon, but this discovery does fuel our imaginations, fill our minds with knowledge, and inspire us to carry on looking. At the very least, it proves just how capable the Kepler spacecraft is and just how amazing the mission truly is.